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The Noël Coward Music Index

APPENDIX 1a

WORKS WITH LYRICS BY NOËL COWARD & MUSIC BY SOMEONE ELSE

BASEBALL RAG (1919)
Music by DORIS DORIS (otherwise DORIS JOEL)
Publ. Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew as sheet music 1919, but not apparently used in any show.  Cole Lesley remarked that "Noël admitted afterwards that the song was not quite as All-American as they had thought it was at the time" - a hardly surprising conclusion when the lyric contains such well-known Americanisms as 'ripping', 'Tally-ho' and 'glide along dear'.

CHAMPAGNE (1960)
Music by NORAH BLANEY
One of the sequence of songs from Waiting in the Wings of 1960, and published (1962) in the folio of songs for the show.  Norah Blaney was one of the cast of Waiting in the Wings.

CHURCH PARADE
Music by PHILIP BRAHAM
Part of 'Fete Galante' from On With The Dance, 1925
This is the only part (of seven sections) of the music which is definitely known to have been composed by Braham.  The composer of the other six sections remains ambiguous - see 'FETE GALANTE' on Appendix 1e for further details.

CINDERELLA SONG
Music by PHILIP BRAHAM (- but MUSIC LOST)
An item intended for On With the Dance in 1925, but which fell by the wayside. 

CO-COMMUNISTS, THE
Music by MELVILLE GIDEON
Written for inclusion in the 3rd programme of the first season of The Co-Optimists in May 1922.  The lyric in the Coward Estate archives - a long and witty one detailing the foibles of prospective Members of Parliament - ascribes the music to Gideon and also preserves three "extra" verses.  Gideon's music has not surfaced at the time of writing.

COME A LITTLE CLOSER
Music by PHILIP BRAHAM
Sung by Delysia in On With the Dance and separately published by Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew in 1925.  A slow foxtrot.

CORSETS
Music by PHILIP BRAHAM (- but MUSIC LOST)
A number intended for inclusion in On With the Dance  in 1925, but which was not in the end used.

COULDN'T WE KEEP ON DANCING?
Music by PHILIP BRAHAM
This number was the music item for the Act I Finale of On With The Dance  and was separately published by Ascherberg, Hopwood and Crew in 1925.  It describes itself as a 'vocal foxtrot' on the sheet music.  A reviewer in The Morning Post on May 1st 1925 thought that this number would have made a better ending to the revue than 'Hungarian Wedding' (not by Coward), which he thought too beautiful & stately.

DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS
Coward wrote new comedy words and his own jazzed-up ending to an existing song by  JUNE HERSHEY and DON SWANDER for Together With Music  in 1955.  He sang it as a sort of joke tribute to Mary Martin (who is a Texan).

DISCOGRAPHY:

OCR 16: NC + orch Camerata/acc. Matz (Together With Music 1955)     

DOWN WITH THE WHOLE DAMN (DARN) LOT
Music by MELVILLE GIDEON                   
Used in The Co-optimists (3rd programme of the original run, Palace Theatre, May 1922), and published in 1922 by Francis, Day & Hunter.  The bracketed title is how it appeared in print, "Damn" being too offensive a word to print in the early 20's. The piece is subtitled 'A Democratic Quartette'.  The Coward archives preserve an extra unused refrain.

DREAM GIRL (c.1917)
Music by MAX DAREWSKI ( - but MUSIC LOST)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics, which shows Coward's careful ascription of the music credit to Darewski.  'Verse' and 'refrain' sections are specified.

ELDORADO
Music by PHILIP BRAHAM ( - but MUSIC LOST)
A number intended for On With the Dance in 1925 which was not eventually used.

FAIRYLAND (c.1917)
Music  by MAX DAREWSKI (- but MUSIC LOST).
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics, which shows Coward's careful ascription of the music credit to Darewski.  'Verse' and 'refrain'  sections are specified.

FRESH AS A DAISY
Music by COLE PORTER
The archives preserve one verse and three refrains of Coward's lyrics, but it is not known whether they were ever performed.

GET OUT THOSE OLD RECORDS
Original music & lyrics by CARMEN LOMBARDO and JOHN JACOB LOEB, a recording of which had been a hit for Mary Martin and her son Larry (Hagman) in March 1951.  Coward reworded it for himself and Mary Martin to perform in Together With Music  in 1955, as the opening introduction of the final medley sequence.  In Coward's version it started "normally" and then swung into an up-tempo syncopated verse with an extended comedic ending.

 

DISCOGRAPHY:

OCR 16: NC + orch. Camerata/acc. Matz (Together With Music, 1955)

GIRL WITH THE DULL BROWN EYE, THE (1917/18)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.  Probably a parody lyric set to the music of THE GIRL WITH THE NUT BROWN HAIR, a ballad popular during the first World War years; but this is uncertain as  the music was not noted.

HOME AGAIN (c.1917)
Music by MAX DAREWSKI (- but MUSIC LOST).
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics, which shows Coward's careful ascription of the music credit to Darewski.  'Verse' and 'refrain' sections are specified, and a revised first refrain shown.

HOME SWEET HEAVEN
(Music and lyrics by HUGH MARTIN and TIMOTHY GRAY)
Included in High Spirits, Martin and Gray's 1964 musical adaptation of Blithe Spirit.  Coward wrote some lyrics for this number, but they were only used in his own recording of the song and none of them were used in either the US or the UK productions of the show.
Coward also wrote new lyrics to Martin and Gray's THE BICYCLE (partially) and THE SOCIETY (completely).  See also WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO CHARLES (on main index).
This song "bears the unmistakable imprint of Coward", according to Sheridan Morley who witnessed the 2001 revival of High Spirits  at London's Bridewell Theatre.

 

DISCOGRAPHY:

NCR 47: Acc.Peter Knight (1964)
ONR 05a: Steve Ross (2004)

I TAKE TO YOU
Original song by MACK GORDON and HARRY WARREN
Coward's version of the song was probably used during the war for naval concert audiences. The main lyric (of two in the archives) is titled "Naval Refrains", and is full of nautical references.  This implies that there may also have been versions for other audiences.   The original song surfaced in the 1941 film The Great American Broadcast. , and was a popular hit by early 1942.  It is interesting to note Coward's quick picking up on another number of immediate public knowledge.

I WILL NOT KISS YOUR HAND, MADAME
Dickie Fellowes-Gordon told Philip Hoare how he and Coward had parodied a particularly sugary Viennese-style sentimental song, during a period in the late-30's when romantic European fantasy was popular.  The original of the parody was I KISS YOUR HAND, MADAME, with music by RALPH ERWIN and English words by Lewis and Young, which had been a hit in early 1929 at the same time as Porter's 'Let's Do It'.  It was later used in the Paramount film The Emperor Waltz  starring Bing Crosby and Joan Fontaine.  Coward's lyric "fits" the original quite well.  His version is quoted in full in PH ( p.281)

I'M OLD FASHIONED
Music by JEROME KERN
As recorded by Coward, he used a  mixture of his own and the original words by Johnny Mercer, with an entirely new second refrain.
We still don't know exactly why he decided, exceptionally,  to record someone else's work during that brief session in 1943 with Robb Stewart at the piano - except that Kern was, at root, his favourite of all the American songwriters (as also he was Norman Hackforth's).

 

DISCOGRAPHY:

NCR 25: Pno.acc. Robb Stewart (1943)

IF YOU WILL BE MY MORGANATIC WIFE (MORGANATIC LOVE)
Music by JEROME KERN
This duet, probably written in London in 1923, is one of the collaborations between Coward and Jerome Kern discovered in 1983.   The lyric was changed and the piece used by Kern & Howard Dietz in Dear Sir in 1924.  It seems quite likely that the Kern/Dietz reworking ended up as the number 'If You Think It's Love You're Right', whose melodic rhythm at the refrain has a certain correspondence with the words of 'Morganatic Wife'.
See 'TAMARAN' below (this section) for further details on the Kern collaboration.

ISN'T THERE ANY LITTLE THING (Oct/Nov 1917)
Music by IVOR NOVELLO
Used in the revueTails Up! of 1918 - but to a new lyric by Ronald Jeans.  The Coward lyric and music credit to Novello are noted in the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook.

LAND, SEA AND AIR
Music by TERRY GILKYSON
Written for Night Of 100 Stars  June 1954
A duet with Marlene Dietrich. Coward's diary entry for 27th June 1954 records: "...we finished up by singing a duet which neither of us knew."  Intriguingly, an amateur recording of Noël and Marlene singing this song has just come to light, which would seem to have been made at this function.

LET'S DO IT
Music by COLE PORTER
The song was first used by Coward during the war, when he was anxious to establish as large a repertoire as possible of sure-fire comedy numbers for his troop-concerts, and he received Cole Porter's permission to re-word it ... which he then did many times over, with 'personalised' lyric versions for almost every audience to which it was then performed.  See BD for full details.

 

DISCOGRAPHY:

NCR 36: pno. acc. Norman Hackforth (1954)
NCR 38: + C. Hayes orch./acc. Matz (Las Vegas, 1955)
ONR 05: Bobby Short (1972)
ONR 19: Valerie Anastasio etc. with duo pno. acc. (2000)
ONR 05a: Steve Ross (2004)

LET'S FLY AWAY
Music by COLE PORTER
A complete Coward lyric for this song was found, among other places, with Norman Hackforth's papers after his death, in a folder of manuscripts, lyric sheets, etc., relevant to the Café de Paris cabaret performances of the early 1950's.  It has not been possible to establish whether the song was actually used in those performances. Extra lyrics are also preserved for other specific uses.
Some of NC's lyrics are recorded in a performance by Bobby Short on ONR 05.

PETER PAN (THE STORY OF) (1918)
Words by Noël Coward & Doris Joel; Music by DORIS JOEL
Included in Charlot's revue Tails Up  (January 1918), at the Comedy Theatre London                                                    
(From Scene 2, "The Journalist's Tale of the Deserted Park").
The song was published as sheet music by Hermann Darewski in 1918
The show was called A Musical Entertainment in two acts by John Hastings Turner, and had music by Philip Braham.  We do not know how much contact Coward had with the production, but It would have been the first time he had come into contact with either Charlot or Braham.  It is a slight mystery why this piece managed to get into the programme, given that all the rest of the material was by Braham. Perhaps the mysterious Doris Joel had influence?

 

DISCOGRAPHY:

  ONR102: Bessie Jones & Chorus + orch. (9 July 1918)

SENTIMENT
Music by PHILIP BRAHAM
Used both in London Calling  (1923) and in  Charlot's Revue in New York, 1924.  The song was separately published 1923 by Keith Prowse & Co.
Coward remembered that in London he "bounded on at the opening performance fully confident that I was going to bring the house down.  It certainly wasn't from want of trying that I didn't.  I was immaculately dressed in tails, with a silk hat and a cane.  I sang every couplet with perfect diction and a wealth of implication which sent them winging out into the dark auditorium, where they fell, wetly, like pennies into mud."  Some months later in New York, Jack Buchanan had rather more success with the same number.  Coward at first convinced himself that was due to Buchanan's apparent effortlessness, but in the end he admitted that it was simply on account of Buchanan's whole revue technique being rather better than his own.
What is surprising is that the song was in the New York production at all, since an examination of the programme record reveals that the number was dropped fairly soon after the opening of the London show.

SIBERIA
Music by COLE PORTER
One cannot do better than quote Barry Day: 'In 1954 Cole was preparing what was to be his last Broadway musical - Silk Stockings, based on the Lubitsch/Garbo film Ninotchka (1939).  He had a number for the three Russian commissars ... in a song called 'Siberia' they gloomily predict their likely fate.  Cole confided to Noël that it was giving him trouble, and in a letter from Jamaica, Noël replied: "...I really have been beating my brains out in a flustered and very flattered effort to help ... there may be one or two bits that will be useful to you..."
... and sent him four very witty refrains.  It is not thought that any of them were actually used by Porter.

TAMARAN
Music by JEROME KERN
Probably written in London, 1923
(Unearthed at the Warner Bros. archive, Secaucus NJ, in 1982)
This is the title song of a sketched-out musical comedy with music by Kern and lyrics by Coward, probably done while Kern was in London with 'The Cabaret Girl' in 1923.  The material was then abandoned, but Kern took music and lyrics of two numbers back to the States, and the following year shoved some of the lyrics at Dietz as if they were "dummy lyrics", and asked him to work new words to fit the tune he (Kern) had already composed.
'IF YOU WILL BE MY MORGANATIC WIFE' (see above) and 'TAMARAN' were the only two completed songs.  There were also some Coward lyrics which Kern didn't set ('I'LL TAKE THE HIGH ROAD' and 'ONE FINE DAY')

THANK YOU SO MUCH, MRS LOWSBOROUGH-GOODBY
Music by COLE PORTER
The archives preserve a refrain lyric of Coward's.

THERE MAY BE DAYS
Music by  MELVILLE GIDEON
Included in the 7th programme of The Co-Optimists (January 1924).  The song was composed during the London run of London Calling  after Coward had lost interest due to Gertrude Lawrence and others being withdrawn for the USA production, at around the same time as his writing Fallen Angels and The Vortex.  It was sung by the 'company' as an introduction to Part 2 of the show, and was published by FD&H in 1923.

TIT WILLOW
Music by ARTHUR SULLIVAN (from The Mikado)
An unused item, mostly still Gilbert but with a comic Coward twist or two, intended for Together With Music, 1955.

WHY DO YOU PASS ME BY?
Music by CHARLES TRENET        
Judging from the fact that the Coward archives preserve a music only manuscript of this song in Elsie April's hand, dating from around 1937,  it suggests that the work was in preparation, perhaps for a cabaret performance, with new words by Coward.  The original 1935 song was titled VOUS QUI PASSEZ SANS ME VOIR.

YOU'RE THE TOP
Music by COLE PORTER
There is no evidence of Coward's lyric version being performed during his lifetime, but it did achieve a typewritten lyric sheet.  A verse and refrain of his version was first performed on a radio broadcast from KALW San Francisco on December 19th 1997, with Coward's lyric recited by Irene Mattei to a backing of a performance by the Picadilly Dance Orchestra.

 

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